Analysis of athenian lysistrata in the play the clouds by aristophanes

First performed in BC, the play is set during the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta, a war that had been raging for two decades by this point. Arguably more important, Lysistrata and the women seize control of the Acropolis, and the treasury — controlling the funding for the war against Sparta — giving them real economic and political power. The plot of Lysistrata is reasonably easy to summarise. Lysisitrata persuades the women of Athens to withdraw all sexual favours from the men until the men agree to end to war with Sparta.

Analysis of athenian lysistrata in the play the clouds by aristophanes

These lines, spoken by the Athenian Lysistrata and her friend Calonice at the beginning of the play, [3] set the scene for the action that follows. Women, as represented by Calonice, are sly hedonists in need of firm guidance and direction.

Analysis of athenian lysistrata in the play the clouds by aristophanes

Lysistrata, however, is an extraordinary woman with a large sense of individual and social responsibility. She has convened a meeting of women from various Greek city states that are at war with each other there is no mention of how she managed this feat and, very soon after confiding in her friend about her concerns for the female sex, the women begin arriving.

With support from the Spartan Lampito, Lysistrata persuades the other women to withhold sexual privileges from their menfolk as a means of forcing them to end the interminable Peloponnesian War. The women are very reluctant, but the deal is sealed with a solemn oath around a wine bowl, Lysistrata choosing the words and Calonice repeating them on behalf of the other women.

It is a long and detailed oath, in which the women abjure all their sexual pleasures, including the Lioness on the Cheese Grater a sexual position. Soon after the oath is finished, a cry of triumph is heard from the nearby Acropolis —the old women of Athens have seized control of it at Lysistrata's instigation, since it holds the state treasury, without which the men cannot long continue to fund their war.

Lampito goes off to spread the word of revolt, and the other women retreat behind the barred gates of the Acropolis to await the men's response.

A Chorus of Old Men arrives, intent on burning down the gate of the Acropolis if the women do not open up. Encumbered with heavy timbers, inconvenienced with smoke and burdened with old age, they are still making preparations to assault the gate when a Chorus of Old Women arrives, bearing pitchers of water.

The Old Women complain about the difficulty they had getting the water, but they are ready for a fight in defense of their younger comrades. Threats are exchanged, water beats fire, and the Old Men are discomfited with a soaking.

The magistrate then arrives with some Scythian archers the Athenian version of police constables. He reflects on the hysterical nature of women, their devotion to wine, promiscuous sex, and exotic cults such as to Sabazius and Adonisbut above all he blames men for poor supervision of their womenfolk.

He has come for silver from the state treasury to buy oars for the fleet and he instructs his Scythians to begin levering open the gate.

She explains to him the frustrations women feel at a time of war when the men make stupid decisions that affect everyone, and their wives' opinions are not listened to. She drapes her headdress over him, gives him a basket of wool and tells him that war will be a woman's business from now on.

She then explains the pity she feels for young, childless women, ageing at home while the men are away on endless campaigns.

When the magistrate points out that men also age, she reminds him that men can marry at any age whereas a woman has only a short time before she is considered too old. She then dresses the magistrate like a corpse for laying out, with a wreath and a fillet, and advises him that he's dead.

Outraged at these indignities, he storms off to report the incident to his colleagues, while Lysistrata returns to the Acropolis. The debate or agon is continued between the Chorus of Old Men and the Chorus of Old Women until Lysistrata returns to the stage with some news—her comrades are desperate for sex and they are beginning to desert on the silliest pretexts for example, one woman says she has to go home to air her fabrics by spreading them on the bed.

After rallying her comrades and restoring their discipline, Lysistrata again returns to the Acropolis to continue waiting for the men's surrender.

A man suddenly appears, desperate for sex. It is Kinesias, the husband of Myrrhine. Lysistrata instructs her to torture him and Myrrhine then informs Kinesias that she can't have sex with him until he stops the war. He promptly agrees to these terms and the young couple prepares for sex on the spot.

Myrrhine fetches a bed, then a mattress, then a pillow, then a blanket, then a flask of oil, exasperating her husband with delays until finally disappointing him completely by locking herself in the Acropolis again. The Chorus of Old Men commiserates with the young man in a plaintive song.“Lysistrata” is a bawdy anti-war comedy by the ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes, first staged in BCE.

It is the comic account of one woman's extraordinary mission to end the Peloponnesian War, as Lysistrata convinces the women of Greece to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands as a means of forcing the men to negotiate a peace.

Lysistrata by Aristophanes: Summary Lysistrata, a strong and clever Athenian woman with a great sense of individual obligation for the nation, has made a secret plan of meeting among all of the women of Greece to discuss on the topic how to end the Peloponnesian War.

She has called the women of Sparta, Thebes, and other cities in the meeting. Aristophanes's first play, The Banqueters, was performed in BCE. The Babylonians soon followed and, as a result of this performance, Aristophanes was persecuted by the politician Cleon for "slandering" the image of Athens and Athenian politics.

The Archanians, the first play to survive, follows in BCE before The Clouds in BCE. The Clouds (Ancient Greek: Νεφέλαι Nephelai) is a Greek comedy play written by the celebrated playwright Aristophanes.A lampooning of intellectual fashions in classical Athens, it was originally produced at the City Dionysia in BC and was not as well received as the author had hoped, coming last of the three plays competing at the .

The Frogs (Greek: Βάτραχοι Bátrachoi, "Frogs"; Latin: Ranae, often abbreviated Ran.) is a comedy written by the Ancient Greek playwright plombier-nemours.com was performed at the Lenaia, one of the Festivals of Dionysus in Athens, in BC, and received first place.

Lysistrata is the first female lead in a Western comedy, and this alone arguably makes Aristophanes’ play worthy of study and analysis.

Analysis of athenian lysistrata in the play the clouds by aristophanes

Lysistrata is the only one of .

Commentary on the Apology of Socrates